Freezout Lake Snow Goose Migration at its Peak
By OutdoorAly

Posted: March 27, 2014

Calling all waterfowl watchers, now is the time to follow the flock to Freezout Lake near Choteau, Montana where the yearly migration of thousands of Snow Geese is at its peak.

Every March Snow Geese usually reach Freezeout Lake, where they rest up from a nearly 1,000 mile flight from California. Best viewing of the birds is from sunrise to 10:00am and from 4:30pm until sunset. Binoculars, telescopes, a light lunch, and possibly warm clothing will make your viewing more enjoyable.

The lake provides year-round opportunity for viewing wildlife, including upland game birds and raptors in winter, waterfowl migrations in spring and fall, and waterfowl and shorebirds in summer. Call 406-467-2646 for an automated waterfowl update.

Here is a transcript of todays waterfowl update:

Freezout Lake waterfowl migration information. Freezout Lake is open for public use year round. There are several camping and parking areas throughout the area free of charge. Spring water fowl migration is well under way. Current conditions at Freezout are mostly frozen due to recent weather patterns. Fowl distribution is focused primarily on smaller open bodies of water in the area. Road conditions on the area are good, it could become muddy in areas as temperatures rise and showers come through. Current water fowl numbers are as follows: Swan numbers are currently remaining low, likely due to limited open water, with approximately 500 bird on the area. Geese have been consistently arriving over the last several days, we are likely experiencing the peak of migration right now, so now is the time to come if individuals want to view good numbers of white geese. And if weather clears, birds will likely be moving north.  More birds are expected to arrive. It is estimated that current white goose numbers are at least 70-80 thousand on the area. Duck numbers remain strong in and around the smaller open bodies of water, with Priest Butte lake currently providing an abundance of ducks, especially arctic pintails. Monitor this message, it will be updated as we see significant changes in spring waterfowl migration.