PCC Not PC

Help Ease the Grief (with Colonel Smoothbore)
By angelamontana


w1Recently I was contacted by agents representing different families asking if I could help them deal with firearms that belong to members of those families. Their questions have led me to offer some advice that will help those we leave behind.

w2The first agent, a longtime good friend of mine, is representing an elderly family member who is in ill health. The gentleman has numerous firearms he has collected over the years, including many limited edition collectors’ guns. Fortunately, he can still direct where he wants the guns to go, both before and after his passing.

w3The second party called looking for help in safely unloading a revolver that he had recently inherited. In this case the gun was an early model Ruger® Blackhawk that had not had the safety conversion upgrade. I helped the individual safely unload the gun, and then we discussed other firearms and issues the family had with them.

w4The passing of a loved one is a very traumatic experience for all involved. It is a time of great grief and great stress. To paraphrase Mr. Franklin, the only sure things are “death and taxes.” At some point, hopefully far into the future, we all are going to die. It is only prudent and kind for us to attempt to have our “affairs, papers, and property” in order. Make sure you have a legitimate will, designate where you want your special items, in this case your guns, to go. When you buy a gun, w5catalog the details such as purchase price, where and when it was bought, and how you want the gun handled after you are gone. As always, be sure your firearms are safe and secure, we never know when tragedy may strike us.

While the subject of death is quite unpleasant, a few moments of careful thought and preparation will help those left behind handle the grief of one’s passing. Now let’s get out the guns and go have some fun at the range.

Be safe and good shooting.

Colonel Smoothbore

www.guncoach.net






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