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Owning a Piece of Montana (by Angela Montana)
By angelamontana


landThere’s something to be said for owning your own place.  It is so empowering.  How about owning land with your place–especially in Montana?  For me, it is like a dream–a really, really, really good dream.

So many people want a piece of Montana, but due to the tough job market and how low pay rates are, not many people can afford to live here–which is why we have so many people from other states who buy here and leave for most of the year to go make their hundreds of thousands elsewhere.  (That’s a completely different topic I won’t even touch here.)

Anybody who is able buy real estate in Montana, specifically, should feel privileged.  But, for me, the LAND part is what I love so much…like land where you can go to part of it and not even see anything but your own property.  Land you can ride your dirt bike and 4-wheel on.  Land that is occupied from time-to-time by deer, elk, coyotes, bears, coons and all sorts of animals you can hunt and trap.  It’s especially awesome when said land is directly across from the Clark Fork River, with fishing access just less than a mile and a half.  Officially being a Montana land owner is empowering and something I have wanted since I was 6 years-old.  I can officially say I own 10 acres in western Montana–well, my boyfriend/best friend and I do.

I have been living my dream just by living in Montana (which happens to be my first love), but now?  I can archery hunt muley bucks from on top of the hill–I love muleys–on our land.  I can throw some dog proofs under the huge evergreen tree in the yard that looks like it has been a haven for those greasy-handed little bandits with their perpetual Zorro masks–on our own land.  I can throw some No. 4 footholds in the trees on the west end of the property in hopes of trapping one of those yipping coyotes that seem to keep our 175-pound Irish Wolfhound responding right back 24/7 with bellowing whines and howls at all times of the day–morning, noon and night–on our own land. I can hope the elk that occasionally pass through the property make their way through again and try and find a bear–on our own land.  I mean, the fishing and floating. And it’s all ours.

On top of that, the property consists of two 800 square foot shops, a main house, a cabin, and six motel room cabins, complete with individual 3/4 bathrooms.  Talk about awesome!  Granted, we have A LOT of work to do before the property is livable, but it doesn’t matter.  We parked our camp trailer on our own land while we work on the main house.  It’s just a really, really good feeling to know that our piece of heaven is not a place we have to go on vacation to get to–it’s home.  AND it is in Montana!

So, as I buy more camo (because I can’t find my camo in the overflowing storage shed that is currently bursting at the seams with our stuff from our old place….so much stuff), I am getting pretty excited about the idea of filling the freezer and putting up fur at our own place–we don’t have to bug our friends or ask to borrow things from others anymore.  No more neighbors 10 feet away from the house, no more tiny yard for the dogs.  I love being a Montana land owner.  I love being a Montana resident.  As a matter of fact, my passion for Montana runs so deep and only intensifies with every new adventure I take in big sky country.  So, what is owning a piece of Montana worth to me?  It is PRICELESS.

Cheers to all of those who own a piece of Montana and to those who live here still because they are trying to preserve the Montana that is a paradise for hunters, anglers, trappers and all other outdoors-related activities.  Hippies can enjoy everything they do here, too, as sportsmen aren’t taking anything away from anybody–the antis are the ones trying to take away from sportsmen.   Cheers to those who are voting NO on I-177 in November and to all who are proud to call Montana home and don’t want to change it–regardless of whether you were born here or a transplant!  Cheers to keeping Montana awesome!