Grizzly Bears Moved from Libby, Bigfork Areas
By angelamontana

Posted: October 21, 2019

Kalispell, MT — Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks personnel moved grizzly bears from separate areas of northwest Montana after the bears attempted to access food sources.

On Oct. 11, FWP captured a 460-pound adult male grizzly bear on private property on Bear Creek Road south of Libby. The bear had attempted to get into a barn by tearing at outside wall boards. FWP moved the bear to a remote location near Poorman Creek in the Cabinet Mountains on Oct. 12 after consulting the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and in accordance with Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee guidelines. The bear was fitted with a tracking collar.

On Oct. 7-8, FWP captured an adult female grizzly bear and then a female cub of the year after the bears broke into chicken coops off South Ferndale Drive near Bigfork. FWP moved the bears Oct. 9 to a remote section near the Spotted Bear River after consulting the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and in accordance with Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee guidelines. The bears were fit with tracking collars.

FWP is monitoring increased bear activity across northwest Montana, and personnel are actively working to reduce conflicts in collaboration with landowners.

Residents are encouraged to report bear activity as soon as possible. To report grizzly bear activity in the greater Flathead Valley, call FWP wildlife management specialists at (406) 250-1265. To report black bear activity in the greater Flathead Valley, call (406) 250-0062). To report bear activity in the Cabinet-Yaak area, call (406) 291-1320.

Montana is bear country with populations of grizzly and black bears. Residents are asked to remove or secure food attractants such as garbage and bird feeders and bird seed. Chicken and livestock should be properly secured with electric fencing or inside a closed shed with a door. Recreationists are urged to “Be Bear Aware” and follow precautionary steps and tips to prevent conflicts, such as carrying bear spray.

More safety information is available on the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks website, fwp.mt.gov.

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