SOUND CHOICES!!!
By Montana Grant

Posted: June 10, 2018

Sound and noises are so important to our survival. Some sounds represent good and some bad. We tend to be tuned into many sounds. Mothers hear every sound their child makes, hunters hear bugles from miles away, moving water soothes, thunder and lightning are scary.

Husbands and wives also are very good at tuning out certain sounds, but that is another story. Sounds make us curious about what is a round us, what is coming, and what we should avoid.

Silence can also be scary or informative. If you are in a noisy forest and suddenly the birds and critters go quiet, something is going on. Sometimes the best thing to say when you don’t know what to say is nothing.

Some sounds are simply awesome. Favorite wild sounds may include a bugling elk, cackling pheasant, gobbling turkey, or your wife saying, “Why don’t you go fishing?” The sound of a cold drink opening on a hot day, the action of a shotgun ejecting a spent round, the sound of a screaming drags on fishing reels all make us happy.

Some sounds signal danger. A rattlesnake buzzing, a woofing Grizzly Bear, growling wolves and dogs, sirens, horns, and screaming could all be deadly. They certainly get your attention.

Other sounds are just annoying. Mosquitos buzzing around your ears or just outside the screen window, barking dogs that don’t stop, a screaming kid that won’t shut up, or an engine that won’t turn over. None of these sounds are pleasant.

Hearing is just one of our primary senses that we use to gather data on our situation. Smell, sight, touch, taste, and reasoning also work in combination to let us know whether we should run, hide, or embrace the moment.

Keep and protect all your senses as long as you can. Wear hearing protection when shooting, decent glasses when afield, proper clothing, hats and gear when trekking. Rely upon the data that your senses provide to help you make better choices and sound decisions afield and in life.

Huh, what did you say?

Montana Grant

For more Montana Grant, visit his blog at www.montanagrantfishing.com.